The Importance of the Women’s March: Musicians Speak Up and Participate

Los Angeles Anti-Trump Elections Protest

Anti-Trump Protest, Los Angeles, Nov. 2016 — Photo: Wes Marsala

Musicians Support & Participate The Women’s March on Washington

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but a lot of our (and your) favorite musicians are participating in tomorrow’s Women’s March on Washington, as well as its many sister marches across the United States and the world. With today marking the official inauguartion in of Donald Trump as President of the United State (wow, I can’t believe I’m actually typing those words…), many of us are scared, sad and even some of us are beyond delirious with what seems like a joke. Well, the shit is real, the star of the reality show The Apprentice is now the President of the United States of America …

Tomorrow we rise up and march. We peacefully march for equality, we unify as one for equal rights for women, immigrants, people of color, the LGBTQ community, those with disabilities, and anyone who has ever been discriminated against; we fight the good fight for those without a voice. We march to ensure the progress of this great nation, and this beautiful planet. Whatever your reasons are for marching, let your voice be heard today, and always.

In an effort to inspire and keep the positive energy flowing strong during tomorrow’s marches, we’ve reached out to some of our favorite musicians who are taking part in the Women’s March on Washington and asked them; “why are you marching, why is the Women’s March important?” Many musicians also took to their Instagram to show their support for the Women’s March on Washington.

Here’s what they had to say:

best coast

Best Coast — Photo by Wes Marsala

Bethany Cosentino of Best Coast

“I march because women’s rights are human rights. I march because some women can’t. I march because I’m afraid and tired sometimes but being surrounded with other like minded, strong women always makes me feel empowered and ready to take action. I march because I am proud to be a woman. I march because I refuse to let a man tell me what I can and can’t do with my own body. I march because I believe in myself and all women everywhere.”

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Evan Rachel Wood (also of Westworld) and Zach Villa of Rebel and A Basketcase

Evan:

“I am marching as a member of the LGBT community, a sexual assault survivor, and a mother, for equality, for women’s rights, and for a better tomorrow. To show that there is still hope and that we haven’t given up.”

Zach:

“I am marching in support of marginalized voices being heard in a time of national turmoil. To stand for peace, unity, and strength in diversity.”

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Alice Bag of The Bags

“I’m going to the march because I want Trump and his supporters to see that we are united against, homophobia, xenophobia, and misogyny. I want them to see that we intend to build bridges not walls.”

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Laura Burhenn of The Mynabirds

“I lived in DC through the Bush years and protested his inauguration in 2001, the Iraq war in 2003, and danced and drank champagne in front of the White House with strangers when Barack was elected in 2008. To go from that high, witnessing the first black man inaugurated (and seeing all the great he did for America and for the world) to this, feels like hell. While I’d love to go back to DC, I’ll be marching in my new hometown, LA — it’s important to do what you can where you stand. I’ve been watching a lot of Civil Rights documentaries and taking cues from incredible leaders like John Lewis. Because he knows what hope and determination in the face of devastating setbacks looks like. We’ve come too far to turn back! We’ve got to keep moving up! I’m marching on Saturday in solidarity with my LGBTQ and friends of color and fellow women and immigrants and non-Christians to show them that I’ve got their backs, and to show the world that Trump and his anger and ignorance is NOT America. Hillary Clinton didn’t win the election (by nearly 3 million votes) for nothing.”

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Emily Wells

Emily Wells — Photo by Farah Sosa

Emily Wells

“To March is an act of defiance… An act of protest. A chance to be very loud, if only for a moment in the streets of the city where many fights will be won and lost. This is drawing a line in the sand for myself as an artist, as a citizen, as a woman, as a queer, as a human being. Every person who gets in the street Saturday is publicly standing on the other side of that line. We are there to be witnessed by each other saying no. Saying “we see you”… “we see this administration” …”we see these cabinet picks”…”we see them answering on the Senate floor”…. “we see the GOP and what it is brazenly doing it directly to us and our planet”. When you participate in a protest you’re there to hold those that you protest accountable. You also go to hold yourself accountable. To be witnessed making a declaration. It’s like a wedding. When you walk through your daily life you walk in the light of that self who made the declaration. It makes it more difficult to fall into habits that forget your own privilege. That forget MY own privilege. This is why I March.”

Emily Wells at The Echo – Photos & Review

#WhyIMarch To March is an act of defiance… An act of protest. A chance to be very loud, if only for a moment in the streets of the city where many fights will be won and lost. This is drawing a line in the sand for myself as an artist, as a citizen, as a woman, as a queer, as a human being. Every person who gets in the street Saturday is publicly standing on the other side of that line. We are there to be witnessed by each other saying no. Saying “we see you”… “we see this administration” …”we see these cabinet picks”…”we see them answering on the Senate floor”…. “we see the GOP and what it is brazenly doing it directly to us and our planet”. When you participate in a protest you’re there to hold those that you protest accountable. You also go to hold yourself accountable. To be witnessed making a declaration. It’s like a wedding. When you walk through your daily life you walk in the light of that self who made the declaration. It makes it more difficult to fall into habits that forget your own privilege. That forget MY own privilege. This is why I March. @womensmarch

A video posted by Emily Wells (@emilywellsmusic) on

Annie Clark of St. Vincent

“Women’s rights are human rights. Go to the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday to make sure the new administration hears it.”

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See you tomorrow.

A photo posted by Tegan and Sara (@teganandsara) on

 

Fiona Apple

 

Stream: Women’s March on Washington Spotify Playlist

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