Miike Snow cement Los Angeles homecoming by burning down the Fonda

Miike Snow

Miike Snow

Fresh from their crazed set at this year’s Coachella, dance pop trio Miike Snow made their L.A. homecoming just as special with a body ravaging riot of both old and new hits. As the vortex of emotionally charged indietronica that they are, lead vocalist Andrew Wyatt found himself at the center of the crowd’s gushing love. Pouring out his sublime helium croons against the surge of Christian Karlsson and Pontus Winnberg synth infused melodies, Wyatt pushed fans into a frenzy of tangled sweaty limbs and over-saturated ecstasy.

Opening with the smoldering electrics of “My Trigger,” Miike Snow wasted little time in foreplay and jumped right into a string of songs that got your blood rushing. Ripping through the neo-80’s grooves and dance-ready euphoria of “Cult Logic” and the teetering exhilaration of “Genghis Khan,” Wyatt’s dulcet vocals were a jumper-cable of bleeding heart sentiments that he had personally hooked up to your soul. Debuting once again the Mark Ronson remixed version of “Heart Is Full,” complete with a thundering brass section, Miike Snow dived into the crestfallen ballad “Silvia” and led us by hand through the song’s winding piano lulls. No longer inside the massive luxuriance of the Mojave tent, Wyatt took advantage of the Fonda Theatre’s chandelier lit intimacy and engaged with fan’s on a rare performance of “I Feel the Weight.” His normally high trills warped into baritone warbles that surged through the crowd and pinned our hearts on the walls, with every head shuddering bass hit and stratospheric hum of samples vocals it was hard not to marvel at the group’s dexterity as performers.

Returning for a brief but eternally satisfying encore, Miike Snow offered another rarity in the form of “Longshot (7 Nights),” and as the trio flexed their previously unknown muscle (delightfully reminiscent of TV on the Radio), the crowd went from a sea of flailing bodies and thrilling sensuality to a buoyant swaying of glittering smiles. Against the uplifting rise of strings and Wyatt’s now astronomical transmissions we floated carelessly towards some hopeless love gleefully beyond our reach. Ending the night on literally the highest note they could reach, Wyatt belted out, with the deafening echo of the entire building, the chorus of their chart topping hit “Animal.” As unfailingly groovy as it was when it first came out, fans shook and hoarsely cried out against its tropical horn blows and pop rumination. Lovingly unhinged, Miike Snow have decidedly returned as the masters eclectic and thoughtful synthpop that they always were meant to be–the caved in floor of the Fonda is proof enough.

Museum of Love, the founding project of former LCD Soundsystem drummer Pat Mahoney opened the night with their driving marriage of percussive rock and subtle synths. Taking a cue from former band mate James Murphy, Mahoney’s group (tightly packed into the center of the stage) performed an off-kilter but audibly entrancing brand of rock that is both overwhelmingly anthemic and refreshingly personal.

Words: Steven Ward

Photography: Ceethreedom

Miike Snow

Miike Snow

Miike Snow

Miike Snow

Museum of Love

Museum of Love

Museum of Love

Museum of Love

Museum of Love

Museum of Love

 

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